Creon pride

Power 7 July Morality According to Aristotle, the most important factor in a Greek tragedy is the plot. The plot must tell the actions of characters from beginning to end. Though, without the characters, the plot has nowhere to go.

Creon pride

In this way, Creon puts himself above the gods, overturning the natural order - the higher order In this way, Creon puts himself above the gods, overturning the natural order - the higher order - that gives structure to life according to the philosophy at work in the play.

Creon defines one morality as being aligned with the integrity of the state and its laws. Antigone defines another morality as being aligned with the will of the gods.

She must bury her brother, no matter what the state says, because this is the only moral thing to do. Burying Polyneices is the only way to maintain the integrity of a natural order that puts the gods above mankind.

This theme of laws in conflict is conveyed as a subtle question at the end of Scene I, as the chorus speaks. When the laws are kept, how proudly his city stands!

When the laws are broken, what of his city then? Which laws are most important? Whose morality is the "true" morality - that of Antigone or that of Creon? The fact that Creon seems to revere himself in his position of king fuels the outrage that he represents; a man fearful of his position sets himself above the gods who are quite secure in theirs.

This is the folly that Tiresias tries to warn Creon about, but Creon is blind to all warnings. Ultimately, Antigone is on the side of the true morality of the play. She is on the side of the gods.

Creon pride

He refuses to even see her virtue and refuses to accept the honest assessment of the situation that Tiresias gives him. The chorus speaks clearly of this flaw in Ode II.Antigone & Creon: Pride or Power? “I will suffer nothing as great as death without glory” –Antigone According to Aristotle, the most important factor in a Greek tragedy is the plot.

The plot must tell the actions of characters from beginning to end. Though, without the characters, the plot has nowhere to go. Essay about Antigone & Creon: Pride vs. Power. KP Paper II (REVISION) Christoforatou Original date: 03/28/12 Revision date: 05/24/12 Antigone & Creon: Pride or Power?

Creon as a Tragic Character in “Antigone”

“I will suffer nothing as great as death without glory” –Antigone According to Aristotle, the most important factor in .

This is the folly that Tiresias tries to warn Creon about, but Creon is blind to all warnings. Ultimately, Antigone is on the side of the true morality of the play.

She is on the side of the gods. Creon's tragic flaw is his unwillingness to yield to Antigone's virtue. I will show how Creon’s pride of power leads to his destruction, and how Antigone’s pride makes her an honorable character who should be treated as a hero.

Creon is a man who has just become the king of Thebes and has a flaw of having too much pride. Creon's pride is beyond the limits of humanity and extends to the definition of hubris.

He believes everyone is out to defy him, when in reality everyone is looking out for his best interest. Creon believes that the people of Thebes should honor him and his power as King. Antigone, alternatively, allows her morality to do the talking.

Creon pride

She thinks that Polyneices should be given a proper burial as Eteocles was given. Their individual pride is what actually results in .

Antigone & Creon: Pride vs. Power - words | Study Guides and Book Summaries