Analysis of metamorphoses

November 1, A close reading points to the latter. For those who see popular film as capable of providing more than cheap visceral thrills, the dismal nature of recent writing on Attack of the Clones is disheartening. While most critics have lauded the film for pushing the boundaries of digital filmmaking, few seem willing to treat it as serious cinema.

Analysis of metamorphoses

Each story contains some sort of transformation or metamorphosis as the link that ties them all together. It has remained one of the most popular works of mythology, and was perhaps the classical work best known to medieval writers and strongly influenced medieval and Renaissance poetry.

Synopsis Back to Top of Page Ovid begins by addressing the gods and asking them to bless his undertaking. This is followed by an attempt by the giants to seize Analysis of metamorphoses heavens, at which the wrathful Jove Jupiter, the Roman equivalent of Zeus sends a great flood which destroys all living things except one pious couple, Deucalion and Pyrrha.

This couple repopulates the earth by obeying the commands of the gods and throwing rocks behind them, which are transformed into a new, hearty breed of Analysis of metamorphoses.

Io, a daughter of the river god Inachus, is raped by Jove, who then transforms Io into a cow to protect her from the jealous Juno. A few shorter tales follow, about how the Raven became black due to the evils of gossip, how Ocyrhoe the prophetess is transformed into stone, and how Mercury turns a shepherd into stone for betraying a secret.

Metamorphoses - Ovid - Ancient Rome - Classical Literature

Jove falls in love with the princess Europa and carries her off, disguised as a beautiful white bull. One of the brothers, Cadmus, founds a new city later to be known as Thebesand miraculously creates a new people by sewing the ground with the teeth of a serpent or dragon he had killed.

The child, Bacchus Dionysushowever, is saved, and goes on to become a god. Jove and Juno argue about whether men or women take more pleasure from love, and call on Tiresias who has been both a man and a woman to settle the argument.

When he agrees with Jove, saying that he believes that women get more pleasure out of acts of love, Juno blinds him, but, as recompense, Jove gives him the gift of prophecy. Tiresias predicts that the youth Narcissus is to die early, which duly comes to pass when Narcissus falls in love with his own reflection and wastes away into a flower.

Tiresias also predicts the death of Pentheus, whose refusal to properly worship Bacchus is punished by his being torn apart by his sisters and mother when they are in the throes of the Bacchic rites. Juno, however, is furious that Bacchus is being worshipped as a divinity at all, and punishes the house of his forefathers, driving some mad and pursuing others.

He then turns the Titan Atlas into stone, and saves Andromeda from a monstrous sacrifice before marrying her despite her previous engagement. Stories are then told of how Latona punished men who were rude to her by turning them into frogs, and how Apollo flayed a satyr for daring to challenge his superiority as a musician.

Philomela resists the rape, but Tereus prevails and cuts out her tongue to keep her from accusing him. Philomela, however, still manages to inform her sister and, in revenge for the rape, Procne kills her own son with Tereus, cooks his body, and feeds it to Tereus.

When Tereus finds out, he tries to kill the women, but they turn into birds as he pursues them. Medea magically cures him, only to later trick his daughters into killing him so that Jason can then claim his throne.

Medea flees to escape punishment but, when she returns to Jasonshe discovers that he has a new wife, Glauce. However, Jove has blessed their ruler, King Aeacus, with the creation of a new race of people, and he promises that these men will serve Aegeus bravely and well.

Cephalus, before returning to Athens with the promised army, tells the story of how his own jealousy of his wife led him to test her unfairly and almost destroyed his marriage, and then explains how a foolish misunderstanding by his wife led him to accidentally kill her while hunting in the forest.

Minos, however, is disgusted with her act and rejects her. Nisos is turned into an osprey, and his daughter is transformed into a bird.

Minos requires Athens to send an Athenian youth every nine years as a sacrifice for the Minotaur, but, when Theseus is chosen as the third such tribute, he is saved by the love of princess Ariadne, who aids him through the labyrinth.

He kills the Minotaur and sails away with Ariadne, although he then abandons her in Dia Naxos and Bacchus transforms her into a constellation. Meanwhile, Daedalus plots to escape Crete with his son Icarus by flying on wings made of feathers and wax.

After his adventures in Crete, Theseus and some other brave Greeks go to fight the Calydonian boar which was sent by Diana to punish the king of Calydon for neglecting her tribute. On his way back to Athens, Theseus takes shelter during a storm at the home of the river god Achelous, where he hears many stories, including the tale of how Achelous lost one of his horns, torn from his head in a battle with Hercules for the hand of Deianeirawhich limited his power to change shape.

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The centaur Nessus then attacked them, only to be killed by Herculesalthough before he died Nessus gave Deianeira his shirt which he convinced her has the power to restore love, when in fact it was cursed.

Years later, when Deianeira fears Hercules is in love with someone else, she gives him the shirt, and Herculesconsumed by pain, sets himself on fire and is deified. The story is then told of how Byblis confesses an incestuous passion for her twin brother Caunus, who flees upon hearing of it.

Heart-broken, Byblis attempts to follow, but is eventually turned into a fountain in her grief. The wife of another man, named Ligdus, is forced to disguise her daughter as a son rather than put her to death, calling "him" Iphis.

Iphis, however, falls in love with a girl, and the gods intercede, changing "him" into an actual boy. When Hymen, the goddess of marriage, fails to bless the marriage of Eurydice and Orpheus, Eurydice dies. Orpheus is given a chance to visit the underworld and restore her to life, and although he manages to soften the hearts of Pluto and Proserpina with his music, he cannot resist looking back for his beloved and she is lost to him forever.

Orpheus then tells the story of how Hippomenes won the hand of the swift althlete Atalanta by using golden apples to beat her in a race, and how he forgot to thank Venus for her help in this affair, resulting in both he and Atalanta being turned into lions.

Adonis must therefore ever after avoid lions and beasts like them, but he was finally killed while hunting a boar, and Venus turned his body in an anemone. The familiar story of King Midas, whose touch turned his daughter to gold, is then related.A close reading points to the latter.

Analysis of metamorphoses

For those who see popular film as capable of providing more than cheap visceral thrills, the dismal nature of recent writing on Attack of the Clones is disheartening. While most critics have lauded the film for pushing the boundaries of digital filmmaking, few seem willing to treat it as serious cinema.

The sonnet is the third in the group of four which reflect on the onset of age. It seems that it is influenced partly by lines from Ovid's Metamorphoses, in the translation by . The sonnet is the third in the group of four which reflect on the onset of age.

It seems that it is influenced partly by lines from Ovid's Metamorphoses, in the translation by Arthur Golding. Notes [1] A good if somewhat dated general view is given by H.A.

Harris in his Sport in Greece and Rome (). (Harris is mistaken in placing the finishing-line at the near turning-post [p. ]; see Humphrey pp. 85 ff.) The only book-length survey, Fik Meijer’s Chariot Racing in the Roman Empire (), is a somewhat unfocused (and poorly illustrated) popular treatment that contains some.

In Franz Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis", the transformation of the character Gregor from a man to one of the most repellent insects, a cockroach, may seem exaggerated and ridiculous, becoming more so over the course of the story as the action builds and emotions become more charged.

Notes [1] A good if somewhat dated general view is given by H.A. Harris in his Sport in Greece and Rome (). (Harris is mistaken in placing the finishing-line at the near turning-post [p.

]; see Humphrey pp. 85 ff.) The only book-length survey, Fik Meijer’s Chariot Racing in the Roman Empire (), is a somewhat unfocused (and poorly .

Shakespeare's Sonnets